Category Archives: Property Management

Patriot Crews Take Advantage of Great Weather

Stream restoration and property screen plantingPatriot crews are out in force taking advantage of the great weather. On one side of Maryland crews are planting a property border of screen trees while crews on the other side of Maryland knock out a stream side planting for a restoration project! Have work you need completed by a reliable and results oriented contractor? Give us a call today!

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Farm Fix Up Guide Ad Now Out

The Equiry Patriot AdThe “Farm Fix Up Guide” in the April edition of the The Equiery is out. Check out our ad on page 39 and visit the agricultural section of our website to see how Patriot can be your “Pasture & Property” professional: http://www.patriotlwm.com/ecological-agricultural-services/

Patriot LWM to Present on Innovative Concepts for Ecological Restoration & Natural Resource Management to the Monocacy & Catoctin Watershed Alliance

Join the Monocacy & Catoctin Watershed Alliance on February 27th at 1pm for their upcoming meeting featuring an exciting presentation by Patriot Land & Wildlife Management Services, Inc., as well as partner updates and networking. Patriot Land & Wildlife Management Services, Inc. will be presenting on their on-the-ground experiences with innovative concepts for ecological restoration and natural resource management. Selected practices include: Utilizing goats for invasive species control; wildflower & pollinator plantings; a new custom cover crop planting service; Biohaven® floating islands; and alternative agricultural production concepts like diversionary wildlife food plots and the incorporation of sustainable agricultural practices on managed lands. Please RSVP to Heather Montgomery.

Location:

Thurmont Regional Library Community Room

76 East Moser Road Thurmont, MD 21788

 

Montgomery County DEP Releases Summer 2012 Stormwater Maintenance Tips

Patriot Land & Wildlife’s stormwater and aquatics division has been hard at work these past few months on stormwater & pond related issues for our clients. Stormwater facility maintenance has been a major focus for the Patriot LWM team to ensure our clients are in compliance with EPA and local government regulation issues long before the inspector arrives on site.

Here is an example of Patriot LWM low impact tree removal on a stormwater outfall pipe for a client this summer

Patriot Land & Wildlife is based in Montgomery County, Maryland, a county which coincidentally has been on the forefront of the stormwater management issue for many years. The Montgomery County Department of Environmental Protection publishes some great informative newsletters for homeowners associations, property managers and stormwater contractors on a quarterly basis. Below is an excerpt from the Summer 2012 edition which you can read fully by clicking here. The newsletter describes very well many of the tasks Patriot Land & Wildlife preforms on a daily basis as a Montgomery County certified Stormwater Facility Maintenance Contractor.

From Montgomery County DEP:

“Summer Maintenance Tips

*Avoid the use of fertilizers, pesticides, and herbicides in and around your stormwater facilities — these products pollute our streams. If manual removal of invasive weeds has been ineffective, limited applications of aquatic-friendly herbicide may be applied by a qualified professional certified by the State of Maryland.

*Removing non-native invasive weeds as soon as you see them in your bioretention facility or sand filter will help to prevent more significant repairs later on. Ask DEP for a copy of your bioretention design if you are unsure what plants should be there. Replenishing mulch to a 3 inch depth (but no deeper) can also help to reduce weeds.

*Contact Montgomery County Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) if a facility holds water for more than 72 hours or if a wet pond has a higher than normal pond level, as this could indicate a problem (Call 311 or email MC.Stormwater@montgomerycountymd.gov).

*With large thunderstorms, comes the movement of trash and debris that can deposit in stormwater facilities or drain inlets. Please continue to remove all trash and debris monthly from your property, especially in and around ponds, filters, and bioretention structures.

Picture from Montgomery County DEP

*Controlling Algae & Other Pond Vegetation – Nutrient Management –Pond algae is often associated with excess nutrients washing into the pond from nearby lawns. Property-owners in the pond’s watershed can help prevent excess algae by only fertilizing at the recommended time and frequency. To learn more about healthy lawns, your community association, along with other residences that may drain into the pond, can contact the Montgomery County Master Gardeners (301-590-9650 or mgmont@umd.edu).

Using fountains, bubblers or other devices may also help control algae in ponds. Be sure to also pick up pet waste, which is a source of bacteria and nutrients in ponds and our local streams.” – End of Citation

Failing stormwater riser structure. *photo by Montgomery County DEP

Preventive maintenance goes a long way, like Patriot crew members painting stormwater riser structures to prevent future failures for our clients.

Patriot’s Stormwater & Aquatics Division prides itself on it’s low impact, environmentally sensitive stormwater maintenance techniques and client services. Contact Patriot today to learn how our preventative stormwater maintenance services can save your HOA or property money and headaches. Visit us at http://www.PatriotLWM.com or call 240-687-7228 for more information.

Summer Derecho Blasts Through Maryland – Patriot Crews Begin Cleanup

It was a scary few hours around the home base of Patriot Land & Wildlife in the agricultural reserve of Montgomery County, Maryland. Trees came down, power was lost, but luckily the corn is still standing and no major damage to the buildings or equipment. Unfortunately the same was not true for some of our neighbors. 

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Watch for falling trees…

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The following is a excerpt from Jason Samenow at the Capital Weather Gang

“Between 9:30 and 11 p.m. Friday night, one of the most destructive complexes of thunderstorms in memory swept through the entire D.C. area. Packing wind gusts of 60-80 mph, the storm produced extensive damage, downing hundreds of trees, and leaving more than 1 million area-residents without power.” CLICK HERE to read more from Jason.

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Radar sequence of derecho thunderstorm complex. Storm traveled about 600 miles in 10 hours at an average speed of 60 mph. (Storm Prediction Center)

Crews from Patriot Land & Wildlife have been working hard to assist our clients with storm damage cleanup in Montgomery, Howard & Frederick counties of Maryland. If you would like a Patriot crew to help out on your property, contact us today at 240-687-7228 so we can help get you back on track!

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Patriot Crews Working on Storm Damage Cleanup

Shepherd University Magazine Article Featuring Patriot President Joe Brown

The latest issue of the Shepherd University Magazine (Fall 2011) includes an article featuring Patriot LWM President Joe Brown. You can view the external link to the article HERE or read it below.

 

 

Firefighter Joe Brown ’08 is an environmental entrepreneur  

By – Jillian Kesner, Staff Writer

Joe brown ’08, owner of Patriot Land and Wildlife Management Services, Inc., came to Shepherd in 2001 after he was recruited from his Poolesville, Maryland, high school to play football. He played four seasons with the Rams as an outside linebacker and studied environmental studies and resource management.

Joe chose Shepherd because the University offered the degree he wanted to pursue and it was near his family and hometown. He lived for three years during his time at Shepherd at the Sharpsburg Volunteer Fire Department, where he volunteered in the evenings and on weekends. His studies at Shepherd were put on hold twice—once in November 2004 after his childhood best friend was killed in the line of duty in Iraq and again the following spring when he was offered a position with the District of Columbia Fire Department. With 12 credits remaining, Joe accepted the position and took classes part-time, finishing his degree in 2008.

Patriot Land and Wildlife Management began in 2005 when Joe was looking for an internship for his degree. “I knew what I wanted to do, but I couldn’t find a company that did all the things I was interested in,” he said. “The degree path I took at Shepherd gave me a little taste of everything—forestry, soil science, lakes and rivers. I decided I wanted to do a little of everything. There wasn’t a company that could handle everything a client would need when it came to land, water, or wildlife, so that’s why I started the company.”

His company started from humble beginnings, Joe said. “The first year or two were slow; it was just an idea,” he said. “I worked 12-14 hour days all the time.”

The company started as a property management firm, managing private farming acreage in Montgomery County, Maryland, with the principal purpose of helping older farmers and land owners who still loved their farms but were unable to continue farming. “We wanted to be one of those companies that helps them keep the farm going and didn’t want to see them lose it,” Joe said. “From there we started managing recreational hunting leases. We saw a need for all these other services and started to expand into what we are doing now.”

Patriot Land and Wildlife Management now employs from three to 10 employees through the year, depending on the season. Clients range from private landowners and investment firms to local, state, and federal governments as well as nonprofit agencies and land trusts.

“We have a lot of services we can offer,” Joe said. “Many people say we do too much and we need to concentrate on one thing. What we’ve found is that we are more than capable of doing each of the things that we do and doing them well. When a client brings us in, it may be because they’ve heard of our wildlife management skills. We may get in there and other issues may come up.”

His client base has grown by word of mouth. “It’s taken these six years to get the reputation we have, which is finishing jobs that we start. We try to do those extra things that set us apart from other companies,” he said.

Joe said that he has been working with the creators of BioHaven Floating Islands to turn them into the best management process and see how they benefit water treatment and how they will impact the future of ecological restoration. “Hopefully we are in on the ground floor of that,” he said. Last summer, a 250-square-foot BioHaven Floating Island, which controls algae and other growth in storm water management ponds and other bodies of water, was installed in Baltimore’s Inner Harbor by Patriot Land and Wildlife Management in partnership with the National Aquarium in Baltimore, the Baltimore Waterfront Partnership, and Blue Wing Environmental Solutions and Technologies.

“They’re seeing a lot of big results and hopefully that will lead to some solutions in restoring the Chesapeake Bay through the different tributaries,” Joe said.

Joe also is working on a research project with the University of Maryland which focuses on storm water management ponds for poultry farms on Maryland’s Eastern Shore and nutrient management within those ponds.

“The company is full service—land, water, and wildlife— pretty much anything that a client would need, from reforestation to wetlands mitigation,” he said. “By being a young company, we aren’t tied to what’s been the standard practice for the past 20 years. We’re out there looking for new, innovative technologies.”

Joe also owns a subsidiary of Patriot Land and Wildlife Management called Patriot LWM Outdoors, which he says is mainly a marketing tool for services and products related specifically to outdoors recreation and hunting. Patriot manages just over 5,000 acres in Montgomery and Frederick counties in Maryland.

The first company Joe started in 2004, Black Dog Guide Service, which he co-owns, specializes in waterfowl outfitting service based in Montgomery County. Clients include current and former professional athletes, and the outfitter works to provide free recreational opportunities to injured soldiers and Marines from the Walter Reed Medical Center through Project Second Chance.

He still keeps in touch with Shepherd professor Dr. Peter Vila. Joe said he loved learning from him. “He’s been a good resource for me to just check in with him and let him know about what we’re doing,” he said. Because of his ties to Shepherd and a desire to see students afforded the opportunity to find a variety of internships, Joe has recently been working with faculty members to partner with the environmental studies department to provide internships.

Since graduating from Shepherd, Joe has continued to serve with Truck Company 17 for the D.C. Fire Company and is also a Captain for the Kentland Volunteer Fire Department in Landover, Maryland. He continues to play football and serves as the general manager for the D.C. Generals, a professional police and fire charity football team. The team plays five games a year with teams from other major cities. All the money raised goes to select charities.

“It’s unique because the competition level is really high, and it’s a way to give back to the community,” he said. Jillian Kesner

Patriot LWM Member Photo Featured in Local Wildlife Story

Just a few weeks ago, in late July, Patriot LWM volunteer Holger Kray of Darnestown, MD put out some trail cameras at a Patriot LWM managed property in Darnestown – one that is blessed with a variety of wildlife, but suffers from a significant degree of trespassing and poaching. A few days later, Holger returned to gather the camera and see what pictures it had taken. Unexpectedly, he got one picture of an early morning invader that no one really expected to see in this suburban area, and no, it wasn’t a sasquatch. As land and wildlife managers, it is our job to keep our eyes peeled and ears tuned in to what is going on and informing our clients and communities of what we see and experience, and offer our professional opinion. It’s amazing how social media keeps us informed – from trail camera picture, to a Tweet, to a news story in just hours….Take a quick minute for a great read posted in the NorthPotomac-Darnestown Patch!

Coyote Spotted in Darnestown

“Coyotes don’t normally pose a threat to people, but there’s always a risk.”

By Glynis Kazanjian
August 4, 2011

A coyote was caught on film roaming the grounds of a private farm in Darnestown in the early morning hours of July 31. Holger Kray, a Darnestown resident and volunteer with Patriot Land and Wildlife Management, said he set up a trail camera there, along with various other properties in the area.

Patriot LWM helps landowners with environmental improvements and wildlife management.

Kray sent the photo of the coyote out in a Tweet earlier today. He said he didn’t do it to alarm anyone.

“We’ve had several sightings of coyotes,” Kray said. “It’s fascinating to inform residents of the beautiful and diverse wildlife in a suburban area. I’m a true wildlife enthusiast.”

Kray said coyotes are present in the area, but should not be considered dangerous to human beings, including children. His neighbor spotted one four weeks ago on Berryville Road in Darnestown, and his wife saw one on their property last year.

Kray said coyotes are here as a natural migration and that they are afraid of humans.

“Their first choice is to run away from humans. This is why you hardly ever see a coyote. They feed on small rodents, on little deer and human beings should not be afraid of them. The same holds true for foxes, dogs and cats.”

A spokesperson for the Department of Natural Resources (DNR), the government agency that manages coyote sightings in the state, said there is no available estimate for how many coyotes there are in the county, only that coyotes have a presence in every county of the state.

“It is a very rare and exciting experience to see a coyote. People normally don’t get to,” said Patricia Allen, Wildlife and Heritage Information Manager at DNR. “Coyotes don’t normally pose a threat to people, but like any wild animal, there’s always a risk.”

Allen said wild creatures are allowed to roam freely, but there are biologists at DNR who study their behavior. There are also two hunting seasons for coyotes: the firearm, bow and crossbow season, from October 15 to March 15, and the trapping season which runs from November 1 to January 19 in Montgomery County.

County residents who are concerned about coyotes may call the DNR nuisance hotline at 1-877-463-6497.

To view the Patch website story, please visit http://northpotomac.patch.com/articles/coyote-spotted-in-darnestown#c