Tag Archives: aquatic management

Patriot Office Christmas Tree Drop Off Program

Christmas Tree Drop Off

Christmas has come and gone, but it is still the season for giving. As you get the last few days out of your beautifully decorated Christmas tree and begin to ponder the best way to haul it out of the house without creating the inevitable mess, it’s also time to think about what to do with it once it’s back outdoors.

Kick it to the curb for sanitation to come pickup and trash? Haul it to the dump? Throw it in the woods along a slow country road (we hate when people do that)? Drop it off at Patriot Land and Wildlife in Dickerson free of charge where we can repurpose it for wildlife habitat all across the area for little critters like rabbits, ground nesting birds, and even fish to enjoy? OF COURSE! What better sense does it make to complete the circle by harvesting a tree for you and your family to enjoy during the holidays, then return it to nature in a still usable state for wildlife to utilize once again! These repurposed trees provide nesting areas for birds, hiding areas for rabbits and other ground-dwellers, and even shady areas in the summer for fish.

So bring your trees on by our office between 8 AM – 4 PM, Monday – Friday. 22300 Dickerson Road, Dickerson MD 20842. Please proceed through the blue gates and place your tree in the pile past the board fence on the left side of the driveway. Please remove all non-organic material (stands, tinsel, etc.) from the trees prior to drop off. We will use these trees across the local area to create new and enhance current wildlife habitat. It feels good to give back, doesn’t it? Happy Holidays from the Patriot Land and Wildlife family to your family!

Call us at 240-687-7228 if you have any questions!

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Montgomery County DEP Releases Summer 2012 Stormwater Maintenance Tips

Patriot Land & Wildlife’s stormwater and aquatics division has been hard at work these past few months on stormwater & pond related issues for our clients. Stormwater facility maintenance has been a major focus for the Patriot LWM team to ensure our clients are in compliance with EPA and local government regulation issues long before the inspector arrives on site.

Here is an example of Patriot LWM low impact tree removal on a stormwater outfall pipe for a client this summer

Patriot Land & Wildlife is based in Montgomery County, Maryland, a county which coincidentally has been on the forefront of the stormwater management issue for many years. The Montgomery County Department of Environmental Protection publishes some great informative newsletters for homeowners associations, property managers and stormwater contractors on a quarterly basis. Below is an excerpt from the Summer 2012 edition which you can read fully by clicking here. The newsletter describes very well many of the tasks Patriot Land & Wildlife preforms on a daily basis as a Montgomery County certified Stormwater Facility Maintenance Contractor.

From Montgomery County DEP:

“Summer Maintenance Tips

*Avoid the use of fertilizers, pesticides, and herbicides in and around your stormwater facilities — these products pollute our streams. If manual removal of invasive weeds has been ineffective, limited applications of aquatic-friendly herbicide may be applied by a qualified professional certified by the State of Maryland.

*Removing non-native invasive weeds as soon as you see them in your bioretention facility or sand filter will help to prevent more significant repairs later on. Ask DEP for a copy of your bioretention design if you are unsure what plants should be there. Replenishing mulch to a 3 inch depth (but no deeper) can also help to reduce weeds.

*Contact Montgomery County Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) if a facility holds water for more than 72 hours or if a wet pond has a higher than normal pond level, as this could indicate a problem (Call 311 or email MC.Stormwater@montgomerycountymd.gov).

*With large thunderstorms, comes the movement of trash and debris that can deposit in stormwater facilities or drain inlets. Please continue to remove all trash and debris monthly from your property, especially in and around ponds, filters, and bioretention structures.

Picture from Montgomery County DEP

*Controlling Algae & Other Pond Vegetation – Nutrient Management –Pond algae is often associated with excess nutrients washing into the pond from nearby lawns. Property-owners in the pond’s watershed can help prevent excess algae by only fertilizing at the recommended time and frequency. To learn more about healthy lawns, your community association, along with other residences that may drain into the pond, can contact the Montgomery County Master Gardeners (301-590-9650 or mgmont@umd.edu).

Using fountains, bubblers or other devices may also help control algae in ponds. Be sure to also pick up pet waste, which is a source of bacteria and nutrients in ponds and our local streams.” – End of Citation

Failing stormwater riser structure. *photo by Montgomery County DEP

Preventive maintenance goes a long way, like Patriot crew members painting stormwater riser structures to prevent future failures for our clients.

Patriot’s Stormwater & Aquatics Division prides itself on it’s low impact, environmentally sensitive stormwater maintenance techniques and client services. Contact Patriot today to learn how our preventative stormwater maintenance services can save your HOA or property money and headaches. Visit us at http://www.PatriotLWM.com or call 240-687-7228 for more information.

Patriot LWM to Present at the 2011 Chesapeake Watershed Forum

Patriot Land & Wildlife is proud to announce that we will be presenting along side BlueWing Environmental Solutions & Technologies, LLC at the 2011 Chesapeake Watershed Forum organized by the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay.

2011 Chesapeake Watershed Forum

The Chesapeake Watershed Forum is a three day/two night conference held in Shepherdstown, WV that brings together representatives from local watershed organizations and local governments to learn the latest restoration science and direction, network with other groups facing similar challenges, and be inspired to continue the work of preserving and restoring the Chesapeake Bay Watershed.

The 2011 Forum will be held at the USFWS National Conservation Training Center in Shepherdstown, WV.

It will be held on September 30th through October 2nd with two pre-forum workshops scheduled for September 29th.

The 2011 Chesapeake Watershed Forum will be broken into 6 tracks which aim to cover all aspects of conervation, outreach and restoration. Patriot LWM will present as part of Track 1, Science and Practice.

Track 1: B: Friday, Sept 30, 1:30 – 3:00 Biomimicry with Floating Wetlands

The workshop will provide general information on how the BioHaven floating wetland islands work, explain the science behind their development and function, demonstrate ecological and environmental benefits of the floating wetland system and show some projects undertaken in the US and around the world.


For more information on the forum CLICK HERE

Shepherd University Magazine Article Featuring Patriot President Joe Brown

The latest issue of the Shepherd University Magazine (Fall 2011) includes an article featuring Patriot LWM President Joe Brown. You can view the external link to the article HERE or read it below.

 

 

Firefighter Joe Brown ’08 is an environmental entrepreneur  

By – Jillian Kesner, Staff Writer

Joe brown ’08, owner of Patriot Land and Wildlife Management Services, Inc., came to Shepherd in 2001 after he was recruited from his Poolesville, Maryland, high school to play football. He played four seasons with the Rams as an outside linebacker and studied environmental studies and resource management.

Joe chose Shepherd because the University offered the degree he wanted to pursue and it was near his family and hometown. He lived for three years during his time at Shepherd at the Sharpsburg Volunteer Fire Department, where he volunteered in the evenings and on weekends. His studies at Shepherd were put on hold twice—once in November 2004 after his childhood best friend was killed in the line of duty in Iraq and again the following spring when he was offered a position with the District of Columbia Fire Department. With 12 credits remaining, Joe accepted the position and took classes part-time, finishing his degree in 2008.

Patriot Land and Wildlife Management began in 2005 when Joe was looking for an internship for his degree. “I knew what I wanted to do, but I couldn’t find a company that did all the things I was interested in,” he said. “The degree path I took at Shepherd gave me a little taste of everything—forestry, soil science, lakes and rivers. I decided I wanted to do a little of everything. There wasn’t a company that could handle everything a client would need when it came to land, water, or wildlife, so that’s why I started the company.”

His company started from humble beginnings, Joe said. “The first year or two were slow; it was just an idea,” he said. “I worked 12-14 hour days all the time.”

The company started as a property management firm, managing private farming acreage in Montgomery County, Maryland, with the principal purpose of helping older farmers and land owners who still loved their farms but were unable to continue farming. “We wanted to be one of those companies that helps them keep the farm going and didn’t want to see them lose it,” Joe said. “From there we started managing recreational hunting leases. We saw a need for all these other services and started to expand into what we are doing now.”

Patriot Land and Wildlife Management now employs from three to 10 employees through the year, depending on the season. Clients range from private landowners and investment firms to local, state, and federal governments as well as nonprofit agencies and land trusts.

“We have a lot of services we can offer,” Joe said. “Many people say we do too much and we need to concentrate on one thing. What we’ve found is that we are more than capable of doing each of the things that we do and doing them well. When a client brings us in, it may be because they’ve heard of our wildlife management skills. We may get in there and other issues may come up.”

His client base has grown by word of mouth. “It’s taken these six years to get the reputation we have, which is finishing jobs that we start. We try to do those extra things that set us apart from other companies,” he said.

Joe said that he has been working with the creators of BioHaven Floating Islands to turn them into the best management process and see how they benefit water treatment and how they will impact the future of ecological restoration. “Hopefully we are in on the ground floor of that,” he said. Last summer, a 250-square-foot BioHaven Floating Island, which controls algae and other growth in storm water management ponds and other bodies of water, was installed in Baltimore’s Inner Harbor by Patriot Land and Wildlife Management in partnership with the National Aquarium in Baltimore, the Baltimore Waterfront Partnership, and Blue Wing Environmental Solutions and Technologies.

“They’re seeing a lot of big results and hopefully that will lead to some solutions in restoring the Chesapeake Bay through the different tributaries,” Joe said.

Joe also is working on a research project with the University of Maryland which focuses on storm water management ponds for poultry farms on Maryland’s Eastern Shore and nutrient management within those ponds.

“The company is full service—land, water, and wildlife— pretty much anything that a client would need, from reforestation to wetlands mitigation,” he said. “By being a young company, we aren’t tied to what’s been the standard practice for the past 20 years. We’re out there looking for new, innovative technologies.”

Joe also owns a subsidiary of Patriot Land and Wildlife Management called Patriot LWM Outdoors, which he says is mainly a marketing tool for services and products related specifically to outdoors recreation and hunting. Patriot manages just over 5,000 acres in Montgomery and Frederick counties in Maryland.

The first company Joe started in 2004, Black Dog Guide Service, which he co-owns, specializes in waterfowl outfitting service based in Montgomery County. Clients include current and former professional athletes, and the outfitter works to provide free recreational opportunities to injured soldiers and Marines from the Walter Reed Medical Center through Project Second Chance.

He still keeps in touch with Shepherd professor Dr. Peter Vila. Joe said he loved learning from him. “He’s been a good resource for me to just check in with him and let him know about what we’re doing,” he said. Because of his ties to Shepherd and a desire to see students afforded the opportunity to find a variety of internships, Joe has recently been working with faculty members to partner with the environmental studies department to provide internships.

Since graduating from Shepherd, Joe has continued to serve with Truck Company 17 for the D.C. Fire Company and is also a Captain for the Kentland Volunteer Fire Department in Landover, Maryland. He continues to play football and serves as the general manager for the D.C. Generals, a professional police and fire charity football team. The team plays five games a year with teams from other major cities. All the money raised goes to select charities.

“It’s unique because the competition level is really high, and it’s a way to give back to the community,” he said. Jillian Kesner

“Water (for the) World” – Maryland Life Article Highlights Floating Island Project

Clean Water Maryland Initiatives

Photo by Christopher Myers - Maryland Life

Countries Taking Notice of Maryland’s Efforts

By Ryan Schultze – Patriot LWM

Living within the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, and more specifically, a stone’s throw from the Bay itself, we are fortunate to have a variety of people helping to improve it. For decades now the Bay has been suffering poor health from pollution and nutrient overload and virtually every species of wildlife has suffered the consequences. While it is true that the Chesapeake Bay Watershed consists of 6 States, Marylanders feel the repercussions the hardest, because all their environmental problems run right into our Bay. To make matters worse, Maryland’s booming development due to its proximity to Washington, DC is aiding in the loss of crucial wetlands which help to filter and remove these pollutants and nutrients from the equation. New technologies are giving conservationists new tools to do battle with, though.

Implementing clean water initiatives is tough work, but somebody’s got to do it, and we have the perfect backyard to prove their worth – the Chesapeake Bay. A recent article in Maryland Life Magazine by Donya Currie highlights some of these very issues-“With its 41 million acres of watershed and 200,000 miles of shoreline, the Bay is the most-studied estuary—which, by definition, contain salt water, fresh water, and brackish water, a mixture of both—in the world”.

Of course, every Country on the planet is experiencing these same water quality problems, also. Well, we must be doing something right. Maryland is doing so many things so well that other Countries are taking notice. The Maryland-Asia Environmental Partnership (MD-AEP) is a new initiative bridging public-private partnerships to address the massive water, energy, and pollution prevention issues throughout the Asian continent, highlighting local clean-water technologies being implemented in Maryland.  “Maryland is well-positioned to help in the quest for cleaner water, both thanks to the natural backyard laboratory that is the Chesapeake Bay and because a trove of scientists, engineers, and business owners has come together to showcase the viability of new technology for pollution prevention and cleanup.”(Maryland Life)

On the leading edge of water quality improvement using new technology are our partners at BlueWing Environmental Solutions and Technologies, one of the partners of MD-AEP. BlueWing and Patriot LWM are constantly promoting BioHaven Floating Treatment Wetlands, which have shown time and time again their benefit across the State in aquatic situations when it comes to water quality improvement. “They’re a concentrated wetland, and they’re made of all recycled materials, which is cool,” says Ted Gattino, a managing partner of the Ellicott City-based BlueWing Environmental Solutions and Technology. “They can be placed in almost any water body. The reports keep getting better and better.” “The Chesapeake is probably farther ahead than many areas in the world in starting to have integrated solutions to energy and the environment and agriculture” says Dr. George Oyler, founder of Clean Green Chesapeake. That being said, Maryland’s leadership in this battle to reclaim the Bay is surely turning heads elsewhere in the world, with other countries looking to us as an example. (Maryland Life)

For a comprehensive read about these new technologies being implemented, check out the attached link to the Maryland Life article “Water (for the) World”.

http://www.marylandlife.com/articles/water-%28for-the%29-world/

Floating Island Partners Hard at Work in Midwest! Cool Videos from Minneapolis.

Here are 2 cool videos featuring our working partners in conservation Blue Wing Environmental Solutions & Technologies as they along with Midwest Floating Island and American Society of Landscape Architects show what impacts one group of regular citizens can have on their own water quality issues. These videos are of a Floating Island launch in Minneapolis as part of an effort to help solve a local lakes water quality issues. Contact Patriot LWM or CLICK HERE to learn more about Floating Island Technology!

http://www.kstp.com/article/12303/?vid=2764965&v=1
http://eplayer.clipsyndicate.com/cs_api/iframe?pl_id=16621&page_count=4&wpid=8700&windows=1&show_title=0&va_id=2764965&auto_start=0&auto_next=0

Hope Floats – Man-made islands create ecosystems to heal polluted rivers

A few years ago, Patriot Land and Wildlife was fortunate to be involved with an innovative water quailty improvement project in Washington, DC on the Anacostia River. Teamed with Bluewing Environmental Solutions and Technologies, Patriot LWM helped install several BioHaven Floating Treatment Wetlands at Diamond Teague Park in DC, with the intention of providing much-needed water quality improvement. These BioHaven islands are capable of removing as many nutrients from the waterbody as 6 acres of natural wetlands.

Diamond Teague is just across the street from the Washington Nationals baseball stadium and is a popular riverside destination for ballpark patrons, among others. The dual functionaility of water quality stewardship and ornamental landscaping allowed for a great project to occur, and lots of attention drawn to the problems suffered by our waterways.  Author Mike Cronin of “The Daily” spotlights the project.

Image

It turns out that recycled plastic may do more for the environment than just save it from unnecessary garbage. Man-made floating islands constructed from the stuff are helping to revive urban rivers devastated by centuries of industrial pollution.The Anacostia River in Washington, D.C., for example, has been slowly coming back to life, roughly two years after the Maryland-based company Blue Wing Environmental Solutions and Technology anchored seven man-made islands there in an area near Nationals Park, where the Washington Nationals play. Those islands are the brainchild of Bruce and Anne Kania, the married couple who run Floating Islands International in Shepherd, Mont.“We are providing an affordable, doable, non-chemical solution, and people are going, ‘Aha!’ ” said Anne, Floating Islands’ CEO.Bruce realized years ago that wetlands work naturally to clean up pollutants, so the Kanias started mimicking floating ecosystems with recycled fiber from plastic bottles.Just days after the floating islands are placed in the water, a film of bacteria and other microbes forms on the mesh filters and other plastic parts of the fake landmasses, said Bruce, adding that the microbes eat nutrients and form biofilm in the process. Biofilm is the base of periphyton, which is in turn the base of the freshwater food chain. Everything from zooplankton to nymphs and minnows thrive off it.“They clean up the water and take nutrients that otherwise would have turned into algae and turn them into fish food,” said Bruce, who got the idea for the floating islands after observing the natural, peat-based floating islands of northern Wisconsin.“Three years ago, we could see only 14 inches into our 6.5-acre research pond,” he said. “Now, we can see 11 feet into it.”

The Kanias founded their company in 2005. Today they have seven manufacturers worldwide and 4,000 islands in use around the globe. Customers pay roughly $27 per square foot and may order any shape or size of floating island, which can be used in rivers, ponds, lakes and even the ocean.
Kevin Hedge, a wetland scientist and partner at Blue Wing, sees the synthetic islands as more than just a savior to an ailing environment.

“The floating islands are an ecological-restoration tool that also can be an economic-recovery tool,” he said.

Lanshing Hwang, the Maryland landscape architect who designed the island park in Washington, called it “an innovative approach — particularly for places that don’t have wetlands.

By Mike Cronin Saturday – May 21, 2011