Tag Archives: Joe Brown

Shepherd University Magazine Article Featuring Patriot President Joe Brown

The latest issue of the Shepherd University Magazine (Fall 2011) includes an article featuring Patriot LWM President Joe Brown. You can view the external link to the article HERE or read it below.

 

 

Firefighter Joe Brown ’08 is an environmental entrepreneur  

By – Jillian Kesner, Staff Writer

Joe brown ’08, owner of Patriot Land and Wildlife Management Services, Inc., came to Shepherd in 2001 after he was recruited from his Poolesville, Maryland, high school to play football. He played four seasons with the Rams as an outside linebacker and studied environmental studies and resource management.

Joe chose Shepherd because the University offered the degree he wanted to pursue and it was near his family and hometown. He lived for three years during his time at Shepherd at the Sharpsburg Volunteer Fire Department, where he volunteered in the evenings and on weekends. His studies at Shepherd were put on hold twice—once in November 2004 after his childhood best friend was killed in the line of duty in Iraq and again the following spring when he was offered a position with the District of Columbia Fire Department. With 12 credits remaining, Joe accepted the position and took classes part-time, finishing his degree in 2008.

Patriot Land and Wildlife Management began in 2005 when Joe was looking for an internship for his degree. “I knew what I wanted to do, but I couldn’t find a company that did all the things I was interested in,” he said. “The degree path I took at Shepherd gave me a little taste of everything—forestry, soil science, lakes and rivers. I decided I wanted to do a little of everything. There wasn’t a company that could handle everything a client would need when it came to land, water, or wildlife, so that’s why I started the company.”

His company started from humble beginnings, Joe said. “The first year or two were slow; it was just an idea,” he said. “I worked 12-14 hour days all the time.”

The company started as a property management firm, managing private farming acreage in Montgomery County, Maryland, with the principal purpose of helping older farmers and land owners who still loved their farms but were unable to continue farming. “We wanted to be one of those companies that helps them keep the farm going and didn’t want to see them lose it,” Joe said. “From there we started managing recreational hunting leases. We saw a need for all these other services and started to expand into what we are doing now.”

Patriot Land and Wildlife Management now employs from three to 10 employees through the year, depending on the season. Clients range from private landowners and investment firms to local, state, and federal governments as well as nonprofit agencies and land trusts.

“We have a lot of services we can offer,” Joe said. “Many people say we do too much and we need to concentrate on one thing. What we’ve found is that we are more than capable of doing each of the things that we do and doing them well. When a client brings us in, it may be because they’ve heard of our wildlife management skills. We may get in there and other issues may come up.”

His client base has grown by word of mouth. “It’s taken these six years to get the reputation we have, which is finishing jobs that we start. We try to do those extra things that set us apart from other companies,” he said.

Joe said that he has been working with the creators of BioHaven Floating Islands to turn them into the best management process and see how they benefit water treatment and how they will impact the future of ecological restoration. “Hopefully we are in on the ground floor of that,” he said. Last summer, a 250-square-foot BioHaven Floating Island, which controls algae and other growth in storm water management ponds and other bodies of water, was installed in Baltimore’s Inner Harbor by Patriot Land and Wildlife Management in partnership with the National Aquarium in Baltimore, the Baltimore Waterfront Partnership, and Blue Wing Environmental Solutions and Technologies.

“They’re seeing a lot of big results and hopefully that will lead to some solutions in restoring the Chesapeake Bay through the different tributaries,” Joe said.

Joe also is working on a research project with the University of Maryland which focuses on storm water management ponds for poultry farms on Maryland’s Eastern Shore and nutrient management within those ponds.

“The company is full service—land, water, and wildlife— pretty much anything that a client would need, from reforestation to wetlands mitigation,” he said. “By being a young company, we aren’t tied to what’s been the standard practice for the past 20 years. We’re out there looking for new, innovative technologies.”

Joe also owns a subsidiary of Patriot Land and Wildlife Management called Patriot LWM Outdoors, which he says is mainly a marketing tool for services and products related specifically to outdoors recreation and hunting. Patriot manages just over 5,000 acres in Montgomery and Frederick counties in Maryland.

The first company Joe started in 2004, Black Dog Guide Service, which he co-owns, specializes in waterfowl outfitting service based in Montgomery County. Clients include current and former professional athletes, and the outfitter works to provide free recreational opportunities to injured soldiers and Marines from the Walter Reed Medical Center through Project Second Chance.

He still keeps in touch with Shepherd professor Dr. Peter Vila. Joe said he loved learning from him. “He’s been a good resource for me to just check in with him and let him know about what we’re doing,” he said. Because of his ties to Shepherd and a desire to see students afforded the opportunity to find a variety of internships, Joe has recently been working with faculty members to partner with the environmental studies department to provide internships.

Since graduating from Shepherd, Joe has continued to serve with Truck Company 17 for the D.C. Fire Company and is also a Captain for the Kentland Volunteer Fire Department in Landover, Maryland. He continues to play football and serves as the general manager for the D.C. Generals, a professional police and fire charity football team. The team plays five games a year with teams from other major cities. All the money raised goes to select charities.

“It’s unique because the competition level is really high, and it’s a way to give back to the community,” he said. Jillian Kesner

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Patriot LWM President Receives Medal of Valor for Heroism as Vol. Firefighter

On Wednesday, April 27th, 2011, Prince George’s County Maryland held its34th annual Public Safety Luncheon to honor the County’s Police, Sheriff, Fire/EMS, Corrections and Homeland Security members. The event was hosted by County Executive Rushern L. Baker III and MC’d by Wisdom Martin and Paul Wagner of Fox 5 news DC. Among the honored recipients was Patriot LWM President Joe Brown, a Volunteer Captain with the Kentland Volunteer Fire Department. Joe received a Silver Medal of Valor for his actions at an apartment fire on April 26th, 2010. 

Patriot LWM President Joe Brown to speak at Suburban Deer Management Workshop presented by University of Maryland Extension

On Thursday, May 26th 2011 from 8:30am to 3:20pm, deer management professionals from around the state will be presenting to Maryland’s decision makers. The program titled “Suburban Deer Management: Options and Choices for Decision-Makers”, will cover a wide range of topics and issues faced by Maryland’s local government officials, land managers, park officials, police, homeowner associations and more.

Suburban Deer Management 2011 Brochure

Here is a press release on the program, sign up today:

REGISTER NOW! SUBURBAN DEER MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP

Local government officials, land managers, park managers, police, homeowner associations, non- profit organizations, private property owners, business owners and other decision-makers are invited to attend the workshop, Suburban Deer Management: Options and Choices for Decision-Makers, on May 26, 2011 at the Elks Club in Bowie, MD from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. The workshop is being offered by the University of Maryland Extension in partnership with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

Deer contribute greatly to our quality of life; however, they have become overabundant in suburban and urban areas, creating major challenges to local decision-makers on how to deal with citizens and their differing views on the issue. On one hand, there are serious safety issues to deal with such as Lyme disease and deer-vehicle collisions. Deer also cause extensive damage to residential landscapes, crops, and natural forests. Some think that populations must be reduced through lethal options and others think that only non-lethal means should be used, such as fencing, repellents, and managing vegetation. Some want a combination of the two.

The workshop is specifically designed for local decision-makers and managers to provide an opportunity to learn from case studies and current research what methods have been used, their effectiveness, and more importantly, how to implement a community-based deer management program in their area. The atmosphere will provide a comfortable learning environment where you can ask hard questions and learn from real life applications. Rather than be reactive, what you learn at this workshop will allow you to work proactively in your locale and, hopefully, avoid the pitfalls. Case studies of successful programs are showcased and the most up-to-date reference materials provided.

More information about registering for the program is available at http://www.naturalresources.umd.edu or by contacting Pam Thomas at the University of Maryland Western Maryland Research & Education Center at 301-432-2767 ext 315. The registration cost is $25 per person which includes lunch and materials.

Agenda:

8:30 a.m. Registration: Coffee and Continental Breakfast
9:00 a.m. Welcome: Jonathan Kays
9:05 a.m. Overview of Deer Management in Maryland
Speaker: Brian Eyler, MD DNR Wildlife & Heritage Service• Population, hunting trends, responsibilities, CWD, upcoming issues
9:30 a.m. Impact of Deer Management Inaction on Natural Ecosystems
Speaker: Anne Hairston-Strang, MD DNR Forest Service
• Ecosystem impact of deer and ability to rebound
10:00 a.m. Overview of Deer Impacts & Effectiveness of Lethal & Non-Lethal Management Options
Speakers: George Timko, MD DNR Wildlife & Heritage Service, Kevin Sullivan, USDA-APHIS, and Jonathan Kays
• Trends in deer – vehicle collisions, lyme disease, agricultural & residential landscape damage
• Fencing, repellents, vegetation management, population management
10:45 a.m. Break
11:00 a.m. Best Practices for Implementing a Managed Hunt Program
Speaker: Phil Norman, Howard County Recreation and Parks Department
• Details, issues, logistics, and what to expect based on experiences of Howard & Montgomery Counties.
11:30 a.m. Utilizing Organized Hunting Groups & Contractors
Speaker: Joe Brown – Patriot Land & Wildlife Management Services, Inc
• Services provided and available to farmers, Homeowner Associations, local governments, and others.
12:00 p.m. Lunch
12:45 p.m. Barriers & Pitfalls of Community-Based Deer Management
Speakers: George Timko, Kevin Sullivan & Jonathan Kays
• Brief overview of liability concerns, dealing with the vocal minority, paralysis by analysis, gaining consensus, and other realities.
1:15 p.m. Learning by Example: Community-Based Deer Management Efforts That Work
• 20 years of Deer Management in Montgomery County (Rob Gibbs, Maryland National Capital Parks and Planning Commission)
• Accokeek Community Deer Program (Holliday Wagner & Byron Williams, citizens in the community)
• Managing Large & Diverse Properties Owned by the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission (WSSC) – (Jim Benton, WSSC)
• Developing a Cooperative Management Program using Quality Deer Management Principles (Kip Adams, Quality Deer Mgt. Assoc.)
2:50 p.m. Question & Answer Session with all speakers – facilitated discussion and questions
3:20 p.m. Evaluation & Adjourn

Directions to Bowie Elks Club
1506 Defense Hwy, Gambrills, MD 21054
Phone 301-261-3260: http://www.bpoe2309.org

• From the Capital Beltway (Rt.95), exit on to Rt. 50 east toward Annapolis.
• Continue east on Rt. 50 until you reach Rt. 3 north towards Crofton.
• Exit onto Rt. 3 north and continue until you reach Defense Highway (Rt.450) east toward Annapolis. Make a right turn onto Rt. 450 east and continue approximately 2 miles.
• Elks Lodge 2309 is on the left side.

Business Gazette Article Features Patriot LWM

In a welcome “coincidence”, the same day we celebrated the memory of an American Hero, an article with his name in it was published. We waited a day to put this story up to allow Kirk’s memory to be properly honored. Now, here is the article from the Business Gazette featuring Patriot Land and Wildlife. Hope you enjoy it.

CLICK HERE FOR STORY ON GAZETTE.NET

THE REASON BEHIND THE NAME: HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO AN AMERICAN HERO, CPL. KIRK J. BOSSELMANN

Over the years, many have asked as to the origin of the name for “Patriot” Land and Wildlife Management Services, Inc. Most just assume that we are borderline “overly patriotic” and sometimes even go as far as to suggest it is a marketing strategy, ha. Truth be told, on this day, March 25th, in the year 1983, Kirk J. Bosselmann was born into this world. A lifelong friend of Patriot president Joe Brown, Kirk spent the majority of his young life in and around the woods and waters of Maryland. Together the two developed a mutual appreciation for nature and an everlasting love of the outdoors and what it has to offer. Often, Kirk and Joe would joke about how great it would be to get paid to do what they love, be outdoors.   

When senior year at Poolesville High School came to an end, the boys had a tough decision to make. Joe was being recruited for college level football and Kirk had his eyes set west to become a firefighting “Smoke Jumper”. Joe’s path took him to Shepherd University to play football and study Environmental Resource Management as Kirk found a smoke jumping team in California.

Several weeks into each adventure, Joe received a call from California. It was Kirk, and he had decided his life needed more direction, he decided to become a Marine. Unknown to his family or friends, Joe made plans to join up with his pal in San Diego and take that leap together. Showing qualities only possessed by a true friend, Kirk convinced his friend not to leave Shepherd, saying “you try college, I’ll try the Marines, and in 4 years we can switch”. And so it was.

Kirk and Joe stayed in touch throughout the journey, with letters and emails changing hands often, and even the occasional return home for a little outdoor related R&R. Each time they met the talk usually led to the same conversation…”how cool would it be if we got paid to be outside?”

For 3 1/2 years all went according to plan, with Kirk returning safely from his first deployment in Iraq and Joe staying relatively uninjured on the football field and even somewhat successful in the class room (to both their surprises).

On November 27th, 2004 the call came. Cpl. Kirk J. Bosselmann, 1st Battalion 8th Marines, Scout Sniper Platoon, had been killed in action while bravely defending his brothers inside the Iraqi city of Fallujah. 2 weeks later Kirk received a hero’s goodbye from friends, family and a grateful nation in the perfect setting for how he lived, the base of Sugarloaf Mountain.

In his final letter to Joe, Kirk stays true to his core, imploring Joe not to weep, but carry on completing the dreams and goals they had set together. To live life to the fullest without a single ounce of regret.

And so, Patriot Land & Wildlife Management Services, Inc. was born, and they are proud to say they are getting “paid to be outside”….